Armagh has developed over the past Millennium to become the cultural capital of the world.  The world-borough of Ireland’s oldest city, Armagh consists of kilometre-high skyscrapers – some extending to the lower fringes of the reinforced atmosphere – and classic examples of architecture dating as far back as the 5th century (the oldest surviving buildings of this world).  Spaceports are strategically placed throughout this planned city, so whether you’re piloting a Class A Executor or a Class X Falcon, there are docking facilities at heights to suit.

The former Armagh City Cathedrals are now encased in carbonised crystal to protect the rapidly eroding stonework.  Although all access to the buildings is now restricted, the fact that every historic building and monument has been relocated to sit proudly within the only remaining ‘green’ area of the Ireland sector, makes it a day jammed packed with walking (spacecraft’s of any size are forbidden from this sub-sector) as you marvel at the remnants of a civilisation which is little more than pages in the history books.  These books, incidentally can be viewed at the Imperial Planetarium at a cost of 25 credits (inter-galactic exchange rates and regulations apply).  There is also a charge of 10 credits to enter this sub-sector (21A) but it is a small price to pay to step back in time without the dangers of modern-day time-travel.

In this megatropolis, hotels are scattered throughout the area at regular intervals.  Towering above the seemingly unending, multileveled skyline, The Galaxy Armagh Hilton sits proudly, glittering enticingly as guests dock at any one of its 25 spaceports or its 12 mini-ports.  With 11,000 suites, it is the largest hyper-hotel in the western division, constantly full of world and galaxy leaders attending the never-ending conferences, lectures and summits which take place at the world-renowned Franciscan Star Chamber.

The atmosphere in this sub-sector is controlled by a hypermatter generator, located on the outskirts of the ‘city’.  This ensures that the air is clean, clear and crisp so the need for breathing apparatus is eliminated.

As with the rest of Earth, the restaurants are limited to the mega-chains, such as McDonalds, Starbucks and Taco Belle, but they each feature at least one restaurant in every other building, providing world-cuisine and, at the restaurants located at the Franciscan Star Chamber, foods from throughout the galaxy are available.

If you didn’t manage to take in the breathtaking view as you entered the atmosphere above Armagh, experience it all by enjoying a ‘day’ trip on one of the 50 colossal G-Class Cruisers.  The trip departs from one of the 10 designated spaceports, with 5 ships departing at regular intervals 24 hours a day.  The excursion lasts for 10 hours in which time you hover above the tallest buildings enjoying cuisine from planets such as Exon 3, Tantant, and Jubar.  Drinks are available from every known civilised planet in the galaxy and the bar staff are vigilant when serving customers to ensure they don’t consume a fatal mixture of other-world cocktails.  The view is indescribable and it is well worth the charge of 28 credits (food and drink are charged for separately).  This one trip will allow you to fully appreciate the magnificence which is Armagh.

Finally, before you leave, make sure to visit The Core Temple – the co-ordination centre for world events.  The Temple is a potent symbol located at the heart of sub-sector A1 and a holographic projection of St. Patrick greets you as you enter at the fifth level docking bay – a powerful reminder of this influential city’s humble beginnings.

Further details are available from The Galactic Hitchhikers and Explorer’s Federation.  Check local listings for the relevant contact information.

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY